MI_title.jpg

Major Activities:



Day 1
Defining Intelligence Discussion
Day 2
Multiple Intelligences Problem Solving

Reading Isaac Asimov & Concept Mapping

Multiple Intelligences Discussion
Day 3
Multiple Intelligences Rating

Multiple Intelligences Matching Game

Portfolio / Goal Setup
Days 4 & 5
Expert Groups Web Content Creation Project


Type of Lesson: Introductory

Context for Learning: This introductory lesson is envisioned as the beginning of the first academic unit of the ninth-grade year. Students have spent the prior days/weeks becoming oriented to the classroom environment, one another, and the teacher. The syllabus has been handed out and reviewed, classroom rules and procedures have been established and practiced, and the teacher has conducted an initial assessment of students’ interests, skills, abilities, etc. The students’ understanding of the concept of intelligence has not yet been determined by the teacher, and the first day of the lesson will help the teacher assess their understanding. Technology used to enhance the lesson will include (if available): classroom blog, student cell phones for blog posting, Promethean with Activote technology, and computer lab. Low-tech alternatives for all activities have been developed as described below. The room/seating arrangement for each day is described below.


Curriculum Standards Addressed:
This lesson plan was designed according to the 9th-grade curriculum in Montgomery County, Maryland (MCPS) and helps students to achieve the following standards.


external image montgomery-b-300x270.jpgCounty Curriculum – MCPS English 9.1 – Becoming Critical Readers & Writers

Standard 1: The student will comprehend and interpret a variety of print, non-print and electronic texts, and other media.
1.1.1 – Prepare for reading, viewing, and/or listening to a text.
1.1.3— Confirm understanding after reading, viewing, and/or listening to a text.
1.1.4 – Apply knowledge of word meaning, context, structure, and origin to define unfamiliar words.
1.2.2— Determine the critical or central idea(s) of a text.

Standard 2: The student will analyze and evaluate a variety of print, non-print and electronic texts, and other media.
2.1.2— Analyze stylistic elements in a text or across texts that communicate an author’s purpose.
2.1.4— Analyze and evaluate the purpose and effect of non-print texts, including visual, aural, and electronic media.
2.1.5— Analyze and evaluate evidence and determine the credibility of information in a text.

Standard 3: The student will compose in a variety of modes by developing content, employing specific forms, and selecting language appropriate for a particular audience and purpose.
3.1.1— Compose effective informative or expository texts.
3.2.1— Prepare for writing by generating and developing ideas.
3.2.2— Select and organize ideas for specific audiences and purposes.
3.2.3— Revise and edit texts for clarity, completeness, and effectiveness.
3.3.3— Evaluate the appropriateness of information to accomplish a purpose.
3.3.4— Use a systematic process for recording and documenting information.

Standard 4: The student will control language by applying Standard English in writing and speaking and making effective language choices.
4.1.2— Apply Standard English grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling in speaking and/or writing.

Standard 5: The student will communicate orally in a variety of situations, for different audiences and purposes, and in different formats.
5.1.2— Participate in and contribute to large- and small-group collaboration for a variety of assigned and self-selected purposes.

Standard 6: The student will listen effectively in a variety of situations and for a variety of purposes.
6.1.1— Apply skills and strategies to gather and interpret verbal messages.
6.1.2— Demonstrate understanding of information and ideas communicated orally.

external image NCTE-Logo.jpgNational Council of Teachers of English Standards:
  1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
  2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.
  3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound–letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
  4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
  5. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.
  6. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
  7. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities

external image International_Society_for_Technology_in_Education.pngInternational Society for Technology in Education Standards (NETS for Students 2007):

A. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. SWBAT:
  1. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  2. create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

B. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. SWBAT:
  1. interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  2. communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  3. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

C. Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. SWBAT:
  1. plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  2. locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  3. evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks.

D. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. SWBAT:
  1. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.

E. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. SWBAT:
  1. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.
  2. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity.
  3. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.
  4. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

F. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. SWBAT:
  1. understand and use technology systems.
  2. select and use applications effectively and productively.
  3. transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.


Objectives (observable and measurable):

Cognitive objectives - The students will:

1. Set individual learning goals for the English course.
2. Prepare for reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by discussing different perspectives on intelligence and thinking about how people of different intelligences are treated.
3. Determine the critical and central ideas of The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon and “Intelligence” by Isaac Asimov.
4. Use digital tools and resources to gather, evaluate, and select research materials on a variety of topics related to intelligence.
5. Create a class website that reflects the students’ perspectives on a variety of issues surrounding the topic of intelligence.

Affective objectives – The students will:
6. Develop and demonstrate appreciation for different ways of being intelligent.
7. Develop and demonstrate an understanding that an individual’s intelligence is not fixed; it can grow and change.
8. Begin developing positive working relationships with classroom peers.
9. Students will examine their own strengths to begin to understand that every student has unique abilities that can contribute positively to the English classroom.



Materials: Materials for each day’s lesson are listed in the lesson procedures, below.

Proactive Behavior Management: In addition to the practices listed in our proactive behavior management plan for the unit, the following techniques will be used specifically for this lesson series:

Each day’s objectives will be discussed in advance, either during the warmup or during the motivator/ bridge for the lesson. The day’s objectives will be posted on the Promethean/overhead/projector before the students enter the room so that the students have the opportunity to read the objectives before the teacher reviews them.

Students’ cell phones will already be set up for posting to the classroom blog to prevent (most) technical difficulties from occurring. The teacher will have discussed that any student who forgets his/her cell phone will use a journal instead and may post their journal entry to the blog at a later time. The teacher will act as the administrator for the blog posts and will read and “approve” each post before it is submitted. This is fairly easy to do and can happen “live” during the warm-ups.

The Activote and cell phone voting technology will also be set up and “troubleshot” prior to the beginning of the lesson.

Groups for activities will be formed in advance, based on the provisions outlined for each activity, below. Methods for rearranging desks, moving about the room, passing out papers, etc. will all have been reviewed with the students during the first week of school. The teacher will remind students of the relevant procedures as the class prepares for each activity.

In the introduction to the group project, the teacher will review the expectations for productive group work with the whole class. The teacher will also review the rules for behavior in the computer lab, as they are most likely stricter with regard to food/drink/movement than are the classroom rules.


Day 1: What Does It Mean to Be Intelligent?


Day 1 lesson is adapted from this Discovery Education Plan: (http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/multiple-intelligences.cfm).

Room Arrangement: Desks are situated in a semicircle facing the front of the room. Students will move their desks into “pods” for the small group activity.

Materials:
Classroom blog
Student cell phones
Promethean or projector
Student journals
Vocabulary sheet
Asimov essay
Blank concept maps

Warm-Up: Free Writing on Intelligence (5 minutes)
Tech Option: Classroom blog is displayed on the screen with the warm-up instructions posted:

“Who is intelligent? Use your cell phone to text the names of people who are intelligent to our classroom blog. You may text up to three names. They could be famous people, people from history, or even people you know!

Next, write a brief journal entry about your thoughts on intelligence. If you’re stuck, try answering one of these questions:
  • What does it mean to be intelligent in our society?
  • What abilities do schools value and promote?
  • How do we measure a person's intelligence?”

Non-tech Option: Have students write down the names of intelligent people in their journals and then write the same journal entry noted above.

Formative Assessment: Journals and/or blog posts will be collected and used by the teacher as a “baseline” to assess students’ thoughts about intelligence before they have been given any further information. (Objectives 2, 6, and 7)

Motivator/Bridge/Developmental Activity: Defining Intelligence (10-15 minutes)

Begin with a whole-class discussion of intelligence like the one in the Discovery Education lesson plan. The teacher will review the students’ blog postings (names) and ask students to share why they posted what they did (if they are willing to share). Then the teacher will ask individual students to share ideas about intelligence from their journals. During the discussion, the teacher should use Promethean/ overhead/ whiteboard/ chalkboard to map out the class’ ideas about intelligence, and the discussion concludes with a concept map that “defines” what the class currently thinks about intelligence.

Possible discussion questions:
  1. Why do you think [read name from the board] is intelligent? What about him/her makes him/her intelligent? (Teacher writes key words from students’ answers on board.)
  2. Do these people have anything in common?
  3. What are some differences between these people?
  4. What does it mean to be intelligent in our society?
  5. What abilities do schools value and promote?
  6. How do we measure a person’s intelligence?
  7. Look at the qualities we discussed about our list of intelligent people. Do all of these qualities match up with abilities that our society and schools promote?

The teacher will conclude the discussion while passing out the “What is Intelligence, Anyway?” vocabulary sheet.

Image from classic-sf.com
Image from classic-sf.com
Developmental Activity: Could There be Something More? (20 minutes)

Asimov Essay: The teacher will give students background about Isaac Asimov with a verbal lecture/powerpoint slide (brief!). The teacher will hand out the Isaac Asimov essay on intelligence and either read the essay out loud to the class or play a pre-recorded version.

Small Group Discussion/Concept Mapping: The teacher will divide students into small groups and hand out blank concept maps with “intelligence” written in the center.

Provisions for Student Grouping: In this initial group activity, the teacher will not yet have a good idea of which students work well or poorly together. The teacher will have pre-selected seven groups of four, attempting to create heterogeneous groups based on students’ reading levels (probably available through the student’s academic records), special needs, race/ethnicity, sex, and interests. The more varied the groups, the better!

Students will participate in a small-group discussion on Asimov’s thoughts about intelligence using an adaptation of questions from the above-mentioned lesson plan:
  • Does Asimov seem to share the traditional perspective on intelligence?
  • How do you think Asimov would feel about the definition we came up with in class a few minutes ago?
  • Can you think of any people you consider intelligent who do not fit the traditional definition?
  • Does reading Isaac Asimov’s perspective change your ideas about intelligence? If so, how? If not, why?

As they discuss these topics, students will be responsible for filling out a concept map about their ideas on intelligence. Each student should create his/her own map based on the group discussion.

Before the close of small-group discussion, each group should choose one or two new thoughts about intelligence to share with the class in whole-group discussion. The teacher will give students a 5-minute warning, at which time the students will be reminded to choose the ideas they’d like to share. The teacher will also give a 2-minute warning before closing the activity.

Formative Assessment: Teacher listens to students’ new ideas to see if any new perspectives have arisen that differ from the class’ “definition” of intelligence. (Objectives 2, 6, 7, and 8)

Formative Assessment: Teacher listens to students to get a preliminary idea of their speaking/presentation skills.

Wrap-Up: Sharing and Preparing for Tomorrow (10 minutes)
After signaling the end of the activity, the teacher will ask each group to briefly share one or two thoughts that they came up with via discussion.

After the discussion, the teacher will review the night’s homework assignment.

Homework: Students should complete their concept maps if they did not have time to finish in class. On the back of the concept map (or on a separate sheet of paper OR on the classroom blog) students should write a paragraph or two to respond to the following prompt:

“Different people have different ideas about what it means to be intelligent. How do you, personally, define intelligence? What kind of things are you good at? Could you be considered “intelligent” at these things?”

Homework will be due at the beginning of the next class period.

Formative Assessment: Concept maps and writings will be collected and used by the teacher to assess students’ new thinking about intelligence. (Objectives 2, 6, and 7)

Formative Assessment: Journals and/or blog posts, concept maps, and writings will be used by the teacher to assess students’ current writing strengths and needs for improvement.

Adaptations: Adaptations for Day 1 will be as listed in our overall list of adaptations for the unit.

Reflection:








Day 2: Getting to Know One Another – There Are Many Ways To Be Intelligent

Day 2 lesson is adapted from this BBC Plan:(http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/intelligence_plan.pdf).

Room Arrangement: Desks are situated in a semicircle facing the front of the room. This will leave ample room for the matching game.

Materials:
Problem solving worksheet
Promethean/projector
Poster board
Markers, glue, images from magazines, scrap paper
Matching game cards
Multiple intelligences worksheet/concept map

Warm-Up: Problem Solving (5 minutes)
The problem-solving worksheet will be placed on students’ desks before they enter the classroom. Students are to choose one of the problems to solve in the space provided on the worksheet.

Formative Assessment: Worksheets will be used by the teacher to review students’ perceptions of their own strengths. (Objective 9)

Motivator/Bridge: Individual Problem-Solving Intelligences (5 minutes)
The teacher will ask students to pair up and discuss the second question on the problem-solving worksheet. (Which problem did you choose to solve and why?)

After paired discussion, the teacher review what was discussed yesterday and connect it to the problem-solving exercise from warm-up. Have the class’ definition of intelligence from yesterday displayed on the board.

Provisions for Student Grouping: Students will be allowed to freely choose their pairs, since this is a brief activity. If an odd number of students is present on this day, allow for one group of three.

Developmental Activity: Multiple Intelligences Discussion (10 minutes)
Image from silverspiral.org
Image from silverspiral.org

Whole-class discussion: Talk about how for homework we looked at our individual intelligences. This relates to Howard Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences. Hand out multiple intelligences worksheet and brainstorm together as a class about what the multiple intelligences might be. Have students fill in the bubbles on the concept diagram on the worksheet as the class brainstorms. The teacher will fill out a concept diagram on Promethean/overhead/whiteboard/chalkboard. If the students do not think of all the multiple intelligences while brainstorming, the teacher will fill in the gaps.

Formative Assessment: Teacher will listen to the students’ suggestions to assess the group’s prior knowledge and understanding of multiple intelligences. (Some students may have studied this topic in middle school.) (Objectives 2, 6, 7, 8, and 9)

Developmental Activity: Multiple Intelligences Matching Game (25 minutes)
Whole-class game: Divide students into 8 teams (one for each of Gardner’s intelligences) and ask them to create a poster with the name of the intelligence and some pictures of what kinds of skills they think go along with that intelligence – provide poster board, magazine images, markers, glue, etc. (10 minutes)

Provisions for Student Grouping: In this group activity, the teacher will have pre-selected eight groups of students (groups of three and four), attempting to create heterogeneous groups based on students’ special needs, race/ethnicity, sex, and interests. The teacher will attempt to distribute students with artistic and dramatic abilities among the groups as equally as possible.

After students have created their posters, each group will give a very short dramatic presentation of their intelligence (pantomime, speech with sound effects, etc.) (5 minutes)

Next, assign one student from each group to be the “representative” for that intelligence and have each student move to a different area around the room, holding the poster for that intelligence category.

The remainder of the students will be given cards with a skill that matches one of the intelligences. Students must figure out which intelligence their skill connects with and stand beside the corresponding poster. The person with the poster must agree that the skill on the card represents their type of intelligence. If the “representative” does not agree that the skill on the student’s card is part of his/her intelligence, the students will call for the teacher to “referee.” At the end of the activity, when all skills have been “matched” with a type of intelligence, each student will read aloud what is on the card to see if the whole class agrees. (10 minutes)

Formative Assessment: Teacher will watch and listen to the students as they complete this activity to gauge how the students work together and how they are developing understanding of the concept of multiple intelligences. (Objectives 2, 6, 7, 8, 9)

Wrap-Up: Preparing for Tomorrow (5 minutes)
The teacher will wrap up the class with a concluding discussion of the multiple intelligences and a description of what we’ll do tomorrow. Review the night’s homework assignment.

Homework: On the back of the multiple intelligences concept map, students should write a paragraph to respond to the following prompt:

“Today we learned about Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. Which of these intelligences do you believe best represents your strengths, and why? You may choose more than one, but be sure to defend your answer using examples from the skills we talked about today in class.”

Homework will be due at the beginning of the next class period.

Formative Assessment: Concept maps and writings will be used by the teacher to assess students’ current writing strengths and needs for improvement, as well as students’ developing perceptions of intelligence and their own strengths. (Objectives 6, 7, and 9)

Adaptations: Adaptations for Day 2 will be as listed in our overalllist of adaptations for the unit. In addition, in the matching game, the student with Spina Bifida will be designated as the “representative” for his/her intelligence and will not be asked to move about the room.

Reflection:








Day 3: My Own Strengths And Intelligences – Setting Goals For The First Quarter

Day 3 lesson is adapted from this BBC Plan:(http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/intelligence_plan.pdf).

Room Arrangement: Desks are situated in traditional rows and columns to allow students privacy for individual work and provide circulation space for the teacher to visit with each student.

Materials:
Student journals
Multiple intelligences rating sheet
Portfolio goals sheet
Portfolio folders

Warm-Up: Statements on Intelligence (5 minutes)
A number of statements about intelligence will be displayed on the board. Students are to state whether they agree or disagree with the statements and correct the spelling and/or grammatical errors in each statement. (The mechanical errors found in the bullet points below are intentional.)

  • Having aptitude or talent in music, art or sports is a way of being intelligent.
  • It is inpossible for a person with a developmental disorder to be as intelligent as a person without one.
  • At school their is equal value placed on all of the multiple intelligences.
  • Each of the multiple intelligences is important and people with different kinds of intelligence can make contributions to are society.
  • If your truly intelligent, it is okay to become complacent in your abilities.

Tech option: This warm-up may incorporate Activote technology or cell phone voting technology, if possible.

Non-tech option: If technology is not available, the warm-up will be completed via journals or worksheets.

Motivator/Bridge (5 minutes)
Briefly discuss the statements on intelligence with the class and ask for a show of hands on agreement/disagreement (if the results of Activote/cell phone voting aren’t available). Discuss the grammatical errors. Connect this activity to that of prior days and then show how it connects to the goals for the day.

Formative Assessment: Warm-ups will be used by the teacher to begin to assess students’ current grammar understanding/needs as well as students’ developing perceptions of intelligence. (Objectives 2, 6, 7, and 9)

© 2011 www.best-career-match.com
© 2011 www.best-career-match.com
Developmental Activity: Multiple Intelligences Rating (15 minutes)

Individual work: Hand out the multiple intelligences rating sheet and ask the class to rate themselves on each category of intelligence and then total their scores to find out their individual strengths. Emphasize that students probably will not get a high score in every category, and that is okay. Every person has individual strengths, and that’s what multiple intelligences is about – finding out how you’re unique.


Whole-class discussion: After all students have rated themselves and found their scores, discuss with the class how all of these intelligences can contribute to the English classroom and help students learn English in different ways. By finding out what individuals are good at, the teacher can learn how to teach English so everybody gets it, and students can learn how they learn best.
Some questions that the teacher might use to spark discussion are:
  • How can people with strong interpersonal intelligence help us with group assignments?
  • Do you think students with strong intrapersonal intelligence might make good researchers? Why?
  • What kind of knowledge or skill could a student with naturalist intelligence bring to English class?
  • Would you want a person with good body-kinesthetic intelligence in your group if we were acting out a scene from a play? Why?
  • Which of these intelligences would it be good to have if you wanted to develop a structured, logical argument?
  • Which kinds of intelligence are you drawing upon if you are great at comparing a film version of a text to the written novel?

The teacher will transition the discussion into the portfolio activity. (“Now that we know a little more about our own strengths, we’re going to use what we learned to set up some goals for this quarter.”)

Formative Assessment: Multiple intelligence ratings will be used by the teacher to assess students’ developing perceptions of their own intelligences and strengths. (Objectives 2 and 9)

Developmental Activity: Set Up Portfolio and Goals (20 minutes)
The teacher will introduce the writing portfolio that students will be completing this year.
Common Task from MCPS: “Set up a portfolio with at least one reading and one writing goal for academic improvement. (Creative and Reflective/ Exemplification)”
Students can put their names on their folders and decorate them; there will be a reading and writing goals sheet inside where students will set their own goals. The multiple intelligences ratings will be placed in the students’ portfolios, as well.
The teacher will try to visit with each student individually to talk about goals. The teacher may elect to have individual conferences with students concerning their reading and writing goals.

Formative Assessment: Portfolios will be used by the teacher to assess students’ developing perceptions of their own intelligence and strengths and to view students’ perceptions of their English class abilities. (Objectives 1 and 9)

Wrap-Up: Preparing for Tomorrow (5 minutes)
The teacher will close by talking with students about the ideas we’ve discussed over the past few days, including Asimov, multiple intelligences, and the portfolio goals. Describe the class project for the next day and hand out the assignment sheets. If there is ample time, assign the student groups for the project today so that the students have more productive work time in the computer lab tomorrow.

Homework: Students should read over the assignment sheets for the upcoming class project.

Adaptations: Adaptations for Day 3 will be as listed in our overall list of adaptations for the unit.

Reflection:








Day 4: Many Perspectives On Intelligence – Class Website Project

Today’s class will meet in the computer lab. The room arrangement will depend upon the facilities present in the lab.

Materials:
Assignment sheet for website project
Web resource evaluation sheet
Rubric Student journals? (if brainstorming is not done on computer)

Warm-Up: Preparing for Today’s Project (5 minutes)
Students should read the following paragraph (displayed on the board) and begin brainstorming, either on paper or on the computer:

“After three days of learning and discussion, what are your current thoughts on intelligence? What does being intelligent mean to you?

Think about all the resources we’ve reviewed over the past few days (the Asimov essay, Multiple Intelligences Theory, and your own writings and discussions).

Today we will create a class website using our blog posts and new information that you will generate in class. Start brainstorming your ideas about intelligence so we can begin.

You can respond with writing, images, a short voice recording, or any other means to express your perspective.”

Summative Assessment Part 1: Brainstorming responses will be used by the teacher to assess students’ developing perceptions of their own intelligence and strengths and to view the progress of students’ thinking. (Objectives 2, 3, 6, 7, and 9)

Motivator/Bridge (5 minutes)
The teacher will explain today’s project of creating a class website and divide the class into “expert groups” to do research on a topic and create their perspective.

Provisions for Student Grouping: With 28 students in the class and 8 topics, this will mean we need 4 groups of 3 students and 4 groups of 4 students. The groups will be heterogeneous and mixed in terms of race, ability, gender, and interest. The teacher will attempt to distribute strong readers and writers equally among the groups.

The teacher will guide the groups in their work together, providing guidelines and coaching the students on the norms of collaborative group work, using the Learning Together (Burden & Byrd, 2010, p.154) model of cooperative learning.

© 2011 Green River Comunity College
© 2011 Green River Comunity College
Developmental Activity: Creating Website Content Through Expert Groups (30 minutes)

The students will use the assignment sheet and web links provided by the teacher to research their topics and then create content for the class website. This assignment is discussed in more detail in the attached assignment sheet. The expert group topics are as follows:

Expert Group 1 – Multiple Intelligences: Research more on multiple intelligences and develop a short page with the students’ explanation of the theory and links to other explanations.

Expert Group 2 – Autism, Asperger’s, and other Developmental Disorders: Research some different disorders (links provided by the teacher) and create a group perspective on how people with these disorders might be perceived as intelligent/unintelligent, include student writing and links to other resources.

Expert Group 3 – Writing About Intelligence: Research some other authors’ perspectives on intelligence (links provided by the teacher) and create a resource on essays about intelligence, including a student summary of each essay.

Expert Group 4 – IQ and Intelligence: Research the reality of what IQ tests mean (links provided by the teacher) and create a group perspective on how well IQ tests really determine a person’s intelligence. Include student writing and links to other resources.

Expert Group 5 – Creativity and Intelligence: Research alternate ways that students might show their intelligence in English class (links provided by teacher): writing plays, performances, creating websites and podcasts, visual media, poetry and song, traditional essays, etc. Include student writing and links to other resources.

Expert Group 6 – Multicultural Perspectives on Intelligence: Research what intelligence means in other cultures throughout the globe (links provided by teacher). Create a group perspective on how the meaning of intelligence can change depending on where in the world you’re from; include student writing and links to other resources.

Expert Group 7 – Communication and Intelligence: Research what intelligence has to do with communication (links provided by teacher). Create a group perspective on how people might or might not be perceived as intelligent based on how they communicate (i.e. if a person can’t speak the language, are they considered intelligent; if a person has a communication disorder, are they considered intelligent; can miscommunication between sexes/genders cause us to perceive men or women as more or less intelligent?). Include student writing and links to other resources.

Expert Group 8 – The Development of Intelligence: Research how intelligence can grow and change as people grow and develop from babies/little children through adulthood (links provided by teacher). Create a group perspective on whether a person’s intelligence is fixed or whether different factors (environment, education, etc.) change a person’s intelligence as they progress through life. Include student writings and links to other resources.

Summative Assessment Part 2: Groups’ contributions will be assessed via a rubric, and this will serve as the summative grade for the lesson. Some of the aforementioned formative assessments will also be graded, allowing students to earn a number of points for participation, etc. (Objectives 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8)

Wrap-up: Introduce the Weekly Vocabulary Intervention (10 minutes)
The teacher will introduce the classroom vocabulary blog to the students. Since the class is conducted in the computer lab, students can navigate to the blog site and view it as the teacher describes the project. This blog assignment will become a weekly vocabulary intervention. Each week, a group of students will be responsible for posting a word to the blog by Friday (so there should be approximately five new words per week). The following Monday, the same group of students will select the “most important” or “favorite” new word from the class blog and create a poster defining that word to place on the classroom word wall. While the group creates their poster, all the other students choose one word from the blog to write about in their journals. During this class period, the teacher will explain the various methods available to students for posting on the blog, which allow students with varying levels of technology to participate. The teacher will also select the first group of students to be responsible for finding words the following week.

Provisions for Student Grouping: After nearly two weeks of viewing student interaction in the classroom, the teacher should have a fairly good idea of which students work well together. Since the vocabulary intervention groups will be more long-term, the teacher will take three major factors into account: the students’ relationships and ability to work well together, the students’ working vocabularies, and the students’ familiarity with technology. The teacher will mainly attempt to ensure that there are students of varying technological ability in each group so that those who are more adept at blogging can assist those who are not.

Homework: Individual work on the website project can proceed as discussed/decided by student groups. Students for the first vocabulary group begin looking for their words to post on the classroom vocabulary blog.

Adaptations: Adaptations for Day 4 will be as listed in our overall list of adaptations for the unit. In addition, during the vocabulary intervention, if the student with Spina Bifida has trouble translating a verbal idea into a visual representation (Corish, n.d.) for the poster, the teacher should ask other students to model their thinking. The teacher should provide a bit of extra assistance when the student with Spina Bifida is part of the group responsible for placing their word on the word wall.

Reflection:








Day 5: Many Perspectives on Intelligence – Class Website Project

Today’s class will meet in the computer lab. The room arrangement will depend upon the facilities present in the lab.

Materials:
Assignment sheet for website project
Web resource evaluation sheet
Website project rubric

Warm-Up: Continuing the Website Project (5 minutes)
Students will meet in their small groups for 5 minutes to do a status update, check their progress, and make a plan for the remainder of the class period. The teacher will update the students on the wrap-up activity for the day so they know that they will need to reconvene ten minutes before the end of the class period.

Developmental Activity: Creating Website Content Through Expert Groups (35 minutes)
Students will continue to work on, and attempt to wrap up, their content contributions to the class website. If two days in the computer lab prove to be too little time for the students to complete the assignment, the teacher will attempt to arrange another computer lab day for the students to complete the project.

The teacher will, over the few days following this project, pull together all the students’ contributions to create a class website about intelligence that includes all of these features/links, the class definition of intelligence generated on day 1, and the students’ blog posts and entries from days 1-3. The website will be shared with parents, the school, and the community.

external image curious+incident.jpgWrap-up: Getting Ready to Read Curious Incident (10 minutes)
The teacher will pass out the books (and audio CDs for those who need them), and the students will investigate the front/back covers and glean information that triggers background knowledge on the perceived topic. The students will stay in small groups to share their background knowledge and ideas about the book. Then the groups will share their ideas with the entire class. After groups have shared their thoughts, the teacher will disclose details of the novel and clarify any misconceptions that might have been formed.

Homework: All students should begin reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. Students for the first vocabulary group continue looking for their words to post on the classroom vocabulary blog.

Adaptations: Adaptations for Day 5 will be as listed in our overall list of adaptations for the unit.

Reflection:










Generalization/Extension Activity: This lesson plan is fairly ambitious, and students will likely not finish early. However, if there are students who do finish any of the tasks early, they may choose one of the following activities:
  • Begin the night’s homework assignment.
  • Preview and begin reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. An anticipation guide or other advance organizer will be provided.
  • Select a magazine or book from the classroom library and read independently. While reading, the student should find at least one word that can be added to the class vocabulary blog. The student may (with teacher approval) use a cell phone to post the word on the blog, or the student may write a journal entry documenting the word and its definition for posting at a later time.